Pathophysiology DQ 14 Student Reply (Martha Gomez)

The Following is another student post to wish I have to reply to adding other information related to what the student post, Remember APA and less than 20 % similarity.

Chapter 55

Question:

 

Isabella, a student nurse, has just started to work in a sexual health clinic part-time where there are a large number of clients who have genital herpes. The clients, both male and female range in age from 16 to 39 years, have varying levels of education and backgrounds.

a.            What features of sexually transmitted diseases would it be important for Isabella to review?

b.            Isabella states, “Why don’t these clients just stop having sex and then their conditions wouldn’t be as bad”? If you were another nurse in the clinic, how would you respond to Isabella’s comment?

Answer:

(a)

There is a wide range of features of sexually transmitted diseases that Isabella should review. Since sexually transmitted diseases at times go unnoticed, it is necessary to diagnose early to avoid complications. The presence of sores and bumps on the genital, oral and rectal areas is one feature that is common in STD’s specifically genital herpes. Another feature to look for is the presence of vaginal discharge that is often foul-smelling which is often a symptom of trichomoniasis. Unusual vaginal bleeding, pain during sex and discharge from the penis should also be checked as they all indicate the presence of an STD (Grossman & Porth, 2014).. Other features of STD that Isabella should review include fever, lower abdominal pain, sore, swollen lymph nodes and the presence of rash on the trunk, hands and feet.

(b)

In responding to Isabella about having sex and prevention of STDs, I would point out on other possible methods through which STDs maybe transmitted. Sexually transmitted diseases including genital herpes are spread through contact with body fluids including blood, semen and vaginal fluids. They are also spread through contact with infected mucous membrane and skin (Grossman & Porth, 2014). As such, sleeping and kissing with an infected person may result in infection with STDs. Isabela should therefore not judge that the patients contacted genital herpes after having sexual contact. Secondly, Isabela should understand that sex is an important psychological and physiological need for humans and a conjugal right for married partners. Sex is also necessary for reproduction. Instead, Isabela should focus on teaching clients on how to protect themselves when having sex if a partner is feared to have an STD rather than make it mandatory for all people to avoid sex.

References

Grossman, S. & Porth, C. (2014). Porth’s Pathophysiology (9th ed). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 978-1451146004

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